Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Erb Garden Videos’ Category

I am reposting this timely advice from our tango with hurricane Irene from last year.  As you may have guessed hurricanes and roof gardens don’t exactly make for a party. For those of you with exposed outdoor spaces, here are some tips to consider as you batten down your hatches and prepare your roof garden for a storm.

1. Bring all lightweight furniture, cushions and accessories inside. Anything that you can lift and fit through the door should be brought in.

2.  Prune prune prune. Any extra branches or leaves you can remove will help reduce the impact of wind on the plants.

3. Cluster planters against the sides of buildings. Small pots that can be grouped together against building walls will generally be more secure than those left on the middle of an exposed rooftop. Of course each roof has its own specific conditions, but this is a general rule of thumb.

4. Turn dining tables upside down (assuming it doesn’t fit through your patio door). They can get caught by strong winds if left in their normal position. Place a protective surface on the floor, turn it upside down and place something on top of it to weigh it down. Extra concrete pavers or small planters could do the trick.

5. Fill some buckets of water and leave them on the terrace. Just in case the electricity goes out you are still going to want to water your plants after the storm dissipates.

Current blog avatar

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

 

Pinus thunbergii ‘Thunderhead’ at the Arboretum at Penn State

I had the opportunity to speak to landscape contracting students at Penn State this past week about starting my business and working in New York City. The differences between working in the country and city are many. While visiting campus, we were able to partake in the tradition of enjoying the creamery and also had a chance to walk through the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens at the Arboretum at Penn State.

The first phase of the Arboretum was completed in 2009 and includes a demonstration Garden, event lawn and overlook pavilion. The fragrance and rose garden is partially completed but is not currently open to walk through. The next phase is construction of the children’s garden which will include a conservatory, education center, Medieval garden, orchard and much more. The plans look amazing and I can’t wait to see it come to fruition.

A Water Garden Surprisingly Still Lush and Full in October

There is plenty to see in the botanic garden this time of season. The original plantings are starting to grow in nicely. Fall color is in full swing now and the Viburnum ‘Winterthur’ stood out with brilliant red leaves and showy blue berries. The gardeners had fun decorating with pumpkins and gourds throughout the garden and there was an entire area planted with festive Chrysanthemums and Kale mixed in with Gomphrena and Salvia still hanging on to their late summer blooms. If you are in State College or plan to go to a football game, take 30 minutes to enjoy the garden and you won’t regret it.

Current blog avatar

 

Read Full Post »

Labor day weekend is here which means school is already in full swing and autumn is just around the corner. Fall is the best time to utilize planters as focal points in the garden. As perennial beds start to die back and the days grow shorter, a spicy mix of foliage can revitalize a bland landscape. Break out of the mindset of only using “annuals” for seasonal displays. I achieve the most striking plant combinations when I mix plants from different hardiness zones.

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ Adds an Unusual Texture for this Fall Display

For early autumn, mix Codiaeum variegatum ‘Johannah Coppinger’or Fluffly Ruffle Fern with Euphorbia x martinii ‘Ascot Rainbow’, Heuchera ‘Plum Pudding’ and Carex pensylvanica. Finish off this gorgeous display of textures and variegated foliage with Viola x wittrockiana ‘Delta Pure Yellow’ for a pop of color that will send your planter over the top.

The Croton and the Fluffy Ruffle Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata) are not hardy in the Northeast. I would absolutely recommend bringing them indoors before the first hard frost. They can be overwinter as houseplants. Just make sure to gradually introduce them to an interior environment and give them a lot of bright indirect light.

In the spring I suggest transplanting everything left from the container into perennial borders around the garden. By doing this you get to recycle the plants and watch how different perennials grow in your garden. This is also a great way to introduce unusual plant species to the garden which you are unfamiliar with.

Current blog avatar

Read Full Post »

Attention all real estate agents, homeowners and investors looking to sell a property with outdoor space… check out this video as we transform a rooftop garden in preparation to list the property for sale.

Outdoor spaces often get the short end of the stick  when it comes to staging and it’s a missed opportunity to maximize the appeal of the property. Jeffrey talks about staging this rooftop garden on Manhattan’s Upper West Side and gives pointers on design items to consider to successfully show off a garden or patio.

Current blog avatar

Read Full Post »

Jeffrey  presents a quick tip for your garden and shows some simple flooring options to easily disguise concrete pavers. Flooring can make an outdoor space feel inviting and complete. Altering flooring materials throughout a garden can also help to break up a large area into smaller more intimate “rooms.” Let us know what you’ve done with your concrete pavers or patio flooring!

Current blog avatar

Read Full Post »

Don’t miss Jeffrey Erb Landscape Design in Elle Decor’s September issue. Check out the article on the 2012 Modern Life Concept House to see images of our planting design we did for the backyard garden. What a fun project to participate in! We were honored to make a contribution to the showhouse which benefited Free Arts NYC.

Current blog avatar

Read Full Post »

Before you tackle your weekend landscape project check out this gardening quick tip! Jeffrey talks about selecting specimen evergreens for containers while stressing the importance for reading plant labels for EACH cultivar. Save yourself time and headache by knowing the mature height and growth rate of your evergreens. Jeffrey discusses the selection of a Silveray Korean Pine tree (Pinus koraiensis ‘Silveray’) for a rooftop garden in NYC.

Current blog avatar

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »